There are various different crimes that can be committed in the City of Las Vegas that will be considered sex crimes, and these can range from indecent exposure to rape or sexual assault. Las Vegas sex crimes carry some of the steepest penalties of any crimes, and being convicted of a sex crime within the city often means needing to register with the Las Vegas sex offender registry as well as any other penalties that may be given as punishment for the crime committed.

Child Pornography

Child pornography is one type of sex crime in Las Vegas that comes along with notably harsh punishments. Child pornography is defined as a visual display of sexual conduct involving a minor, and this display can come in the form of photographs, video, or other types of visual images. The production, the possession, and the distribution of child pornography is illegal in the State of Nevada, as well as anywhere else in the United States, and a person may expect to face harsh penalties if they are charged with child pornography related offenses. Most significantly, whether the State of Nevada or the Federal Government choose to prosecute any specific child pornography case can make huge differences in the penalties which will be faced.

Child pornography charges are always felonies. A person found to be in possession of child pornography, creating child pornography, or distributing child pornography, can expect felony level punishments to result from a conviction. For possessing child pornography, a person can expect a penalty of 1 to 6 years spent in prison with fines that go as high as $5,000 for a first offense. For subsequent offenses after a first, a person can expect additional felony level charges that can carry a punishment of imprisonment as long as 1 year to life. Federal level sentences are based upon the federal sentencing guidelines and are usually based upon the number of images or videos possessed by the person charged. Overall, federal sentences are usually double or triple anything the Nevada State courts will impose.

Distributing child pornography is also a felony offense, and being convicted of distributing this type of pornography can cause a person to face penalties of between 1 and 15 years spent in prison as well as a fine not exceeding $15,000. Producing or allowing a child to assist in the production of child pornography carries the greatest charges in Nevada, and a person convicted of this crime can expect a fine of up to $100,000 as well as a life sentence to be spent in a Nevada state prison. With regards to distribution charges, the use of “file sharing” software to download child pornography has placed unsuspecting individuals in the category of distributors since file sharing software almost always automatically allow a user’s files to be uploaded to other users of the file sharing service, thus making everyone using the service a “distributor” facing mush stiffer penalties.

Indecent Exposure

Indecent exposure is defined in Nevada as making any open indecent or obscene exposure of his or her body parts, and the exposure of one’s genitalia, buttocks, or breasts can constitute indecent exposure. Indecent exposure must be done intentionally to be considered a crime, and wardrobe malfunctions or accidents that unintentionally show a person’s body may not cause criminal charges to be filed.

A first indecent exposure charge will be considered a gross misdemeanor, which is more serious than a standard misdemeanor but not as harsh as a felony. This will come along with punishments such as up to 1 year spent in jail as well as a fine of up to $2,000. Those convicted of indecent exposure will also have to register as a sex offender with the Nevada registry. Subsequent indecent exposure convictions after a first will be considered felonies, and this will also mean harsher penalties. Those facing subsequent convictions can expect punishments of 1 to 4 years spent in a Nevada state prison as well as fines that may go as high as $5,000 and sex offender registration.

Prostitution

Despite popular belief, prostitution is not legal in the City of Las Vegas or Clark County, Nevada. In addition, prostitution as well as soliciting a prostitute can carry significant legal penalties for those convicted. Prostitution or soliciting a prostitute in the city of Las Vegas will typically come with misdemeanor charges and appropriate punishments; however punishments and charges will be more serious if the prostitute is found to be under the age of 18.

For adults charged with prostitution or soliciting a prostitute, they may expect a 6 month jail sentence as well as a fine around $1,000; however, if a person is facing a first time offense, probation is often given rather than time spent in jail. For subsequent convictions the benefit of probation is often not given and a person will then be forced to serve their time incarcerated.

If a person is found to have solicited a prostitute that was a minor, or under the age of 18, they will then face category E felony charges rather than the misdemeanor charges typically given for this crime with another adult. These felony charges will come with harsher penalties as well including a 4 year prison sentence in a Nevada state prison as well as around $5,000 in fines.

Las Vegas also has very severe legal consequences for those facing pimping and pandering charges.

Importance of an Attorney in Las vegas Sex Crimes Cases

Sex crimes are taken very seriously in Las Vegas, Nevada and it is always important that those facing charges seek the assistance of a skilled attorney. Gabriel L. Grasso has over 20 years of experience defending against sex crimes. Both in State and Federal courts, few Las Vegas lawyers have a better track record successfully handling and defending sex offense cases in the state of Nevada. Call (702) 868-8866 to speak to a criminal defense lawyer today.

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Date:April 1, 2014